Clear E-Log Violations 3-Step Follow

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Clear E-Log Violations 3-Step Follow

Clearing an E-log violation from a driver app involves addressing and resolving the violation issue recorded in the electronic logging device (ELD) or driver app used to log driving and duty hours. If the driver app or ELD allows, you may be able to submit an edit request to the carrier’s safety department or the appropriate authority, providing an explanation for the violation and the corrective action taken. Some violations may be eligible for editing, while others may require a formal process for correction.

The following number of violations that show by mistakenly on e-log.

How to clear this violation and what are the essay things should be known to clear the e-log violation from logbook. This violation is visible on the logbook due to exceeding the driving limit. But this violation can be removed from e-log through your fleet admin dashboard or ELD service provider company. ELD Company provides some additional features to your fleet admin dashboard to clear this violation.

Fleet admin can edit your logbook from the admin dashboard and remove the violation if any option is available on the dashboard. If 11-hour driving will not clear from the logbook, then it will be visible in the next 2 weeks.

Clear E-Log Violations 3-Step Follow14-Hour Shift Limit Violation.

This violation can be removed from the driver app. But the driver should know about this violation and why it appears in the logbook. There is a simple answer to this question why normally this violation is visible on driver app while he drove the truck under 11-hour limit. Sometimes driver stops their truck for pick up the load and unload that time they select off duty for 2 or 3 hour long. But when they start their driver, after some hours the 14-hour shift limit violation is shown.

However, the driver only uses his 8 or 9 hours of driving. At that time this violation will automatically be removed from the driver app after sleeper.

Why 14-hour shift limit violation is visible if I drove the truck for 11 hours, but the violation is still visible on the logbook?

Some time driver selected the on-duty time extremely long hour during the pre-trip inspection. If this violation shows up in the logbook, at that time the driver can reduce the pre-trip inspection time for clear this violation.

If you drove the truck for 11 hours and received a 14-hour shift limit violation on your logbook, it could be due to a misunderstanding or incorrect recording of your driving and on-duty hours.

The 14-hour shift limit violation is based on the total time a commercial motor vehicle (CMV) driver spends on duty after coming on duty following a period of at least 10 consecutive hours off duty. The 14-hour limit is a continuous period that includes all on-duty time, including driving, breaks, and non-driving tasks.

Why does logbook show violation of 14-hour shift limit if I used split sleeper berth?

There are many drivers confused with this violation that I am used my split sleeper berth properly and split sleeper hours were visible in my clock. Then what happened to logbook. At that time the driver must need patience. This is because its violation will automatically be removed from the logbook when the driver completes his second period of sleeper.

If your logbook is showing a violation of the 14-hour shift limit despite using the Split Sleeper Berth provision, there might be several reasons for this issue.

  • Incorrect Split Sleeper Berth Usage: One possible reason is that you might not have used the Split Sleeper Berth provision correctly. Ensure that you meet the specific requirements for either the 8/2 split or the 7/3 split option, and that the total off-duty time achieved through the two periods adds up to at least 10 hours.
  • Exceeding 14-Hour Limit: The 14-hour shift limit is a continuous period that starts when you come on duty after a minimum of 10 consecutive hours off duty. If you exceed the 14-hour limit (which includes all on-duty time, not just driving), it will result in a violation, even if you used the Split Sleeper Berth provision.
  • Clear E-Log Violations 3-Step FollowNot Logging Properly: It’s essential to accurately log your driving, on-duty, and off-duty periods in your logbook or electronic logging device (ELD). Any errors or discrepancies in the log may lead to violations.
  • ELD Malfunction or Configuration Issue: If you are using an ELD, there might be an issue with the device itself or its configuration, resulting in incorrect calculations or reporting of hours.
  • Violation Outside Split Sleeper Berth Period: If the violation occurred outside the split sleeper berth period, it would not be affected by the split. Remember that the Split Sleeper Berth provision only impacts the way the 10-hour off-duty time is divided.

To resolve this issue.

Review your logbook or ELD data to ensure all entries are accurate and correctly reflect the use of the Split Sleeper Berth provision.

Verify that your total on-duty time, including driving and non-driving activities, does not exceed the 14-hour shift limit.

Check for any data entry errors in your log and correct them promptly.

If you are using an ELD, ensure it is properly configured and functioning correctly.

Consult with your carrier’s safety department or compliance personnel to investigate and resolve the issue.

It’s crucial to use the Split Sleeper Berth provision correctly and ensure accurate recording of your driving and on-duty hours to comply with the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) Hours of Service (HOS) regulations.

FAQs

Q1.) What is the difference between a Form and Manner violation and a Substantive violation?

Ans-: A Form and Manner violation involves errors or omissions in the way information is recorded, such as missing or incomplete entries. Substantive violations, on the other hand, involve more serious non-compliance with the actual driving and rest regulations.

Q2.) Is there an appeals process for E-Log Violations?

Ans-: Yes, there is typically an appeals process available for drivers who believe they have received an unjust E-Log Violation. Drivers can follow the established procedures to contest and appeal violations.

Q3.) Can carriers be held responsible for E-Log Violations committed by drivers?

Ans-: Yes, carriers can be held responsible for E-Log Violations if they are found to have knowingly allowed or encouraged non-compliance. Carriers are expected to monitor and enforce compliance with electronic logging regulations.

Q4.) Can technical issues lead to E-Log Violations?

Ana-: Yes, technical issues with electronic logging devices (ELDs) or connectivity problems can sometimes lead to E-Log Violations. It’s essential for drivers to promptly address any technical issues and keep their ELDs in good working condition.

Q5.) How can drivers avoid E-Log Violations?

Ans-: Drivers can avoid E-Log Violations by consistently and accurately logging their driving hours, taking required rest breaks, and ensuring compliance with all regulations. Familiarity with the specific rules and regulations in their jurisdiction is crucial.

Click here to know how HOS violation can be cleared

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